What is browser cache?

Samiko
������������������������������������ ����������������������������������������Samiko ������������������������������������
��������������������������������������������January 24, 2015
What is browser cache?

Each of the different types of memory - operational, flash, permanent, cmos, cache, etc. characterized by its features and methods of organization and access. For faster access to data, the processor cache is used. The browser cache works in the same way - to facilitate access to certain data.

Let's take a closer look at what browser cache is.

Browser cache: definition and purpose

The browser's cache is an area on the hard disk where data downloaded from the Internet is stored when browsing the web. Saving data goes to save traffic, speed up the browser.

The cache allows you to load pages that the user accessed earlier, with greater speed. This is achieved due to the fact that:

  1. there is no need to reload the page completely; only changed items are loaded;
  2. The page is loaded from the hard disk.

For example, it can be traced when several tabs are open in the browser. Then you close the browser and the next time you open it, the previously opened tabs are loaded.Also, a big advantage of the cache is the ability to "offline" return to previously viewed data - images, videos or music. All previously opened files are stored in the browser folder.

For Mozilla Firefox in Windows XP:

  • C: \ Documents and Settings \ User \ Local Settings \ Application Data \ Mozilla \ Firefox \ Profiles \ p5polqte.default \ cache2 \ entries

Common path for any user:

  • C: \ Documents and Settings \ User \ Local Settings \ Application Data \ Mozilla \ Firefox \ Profiles \

Other web browsers have similar folders.

Despite all the advantages of the cache, the place for it is extremely limited, so it is periodically recommended to clean it:

  • to free up memory on the hard disk;
  • for the correct display of web pages;
  • to eliminate the "inhibition" of the browser;
  • to remove viruses (for example, banners on the whole working window).